Conference

The Internationals Fall Professional Development Conference is a one day conference where you will have the opportunity to attend a full day of workshops covering a range of topics particular to ELL education. This year’s conference will also feature alumni and professional panels.

For general questions, contact Clarissa at clarissa.cummings@internationalsnetwork.org. For registration questions and issues, contact Jade at jade.vasquez@internationalsnetwork.org.

Tuesday, November 7th
8:30am – 3:30pm

The Manhattan International High School
317 East 67th Street
New York, NY 10065

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Registration has closed. We can only take walk-in registrations on the day of the conference, if space is available.
  • Lunch and workshop materials will be provided..

GETTING TO THE CONFERENCE:

6 Train to 68th Street Station

Q Train to 72nd Street Station

Please use Google maps to confirm the best route for you.

AGENDA

8:00 AM – 8:45 AM             Registration & Breakfast

8:45 AM – 9:15 AM              Welcome & Opening Remarks

9:25 AM – 11:25 PM             Morning Workshop Session

11:30 AM – 1:30 PM             Lunch and Midday Session

1:30 AM – 3:30 PM              Afternoon Workshop Session

REGISTRATION

Registration will begin promptly at 8am!  All attendees must register at the table according to the borough of their school. Once registered, attendees will receive a nametag with their personalized workshop schedule for the day.

MIDDAY SESSION

Beyond School: Discussing Social Contexts that Influence Our Students’ Lives, our Work, and the Pursuit of Safe, Affirming Communities

Given the theme of this year’s Internationals Network Fall Professional Development Conference, “Building Safe and Affirming Schools: Empowering Immigrant Students through Community,” we are excited to feature a set of mid-day panels on issues that surround our work, both in the world outside of our schools and in the time after graduation, with conversations between authors, organizations, and alumni.

What are the social contexts facing the lives of young people in our communities? What are the trends others who help serve them are seeing? How are graduates using what they’ve learned in our classes and schools to accomplish new goals in life beyond high school? The mid-day panels will focus on these questions and more, and both sessions will feature Oakland International’s own Lauren Markham, author of the new book, The Faraway Brothers: Two Young Migrants and the Making of An American Life.

Participants

Lauren Markham (The Far Away Brothers: Two Young Migrants and the Making of an American Life)

Molly Delano (Youth Development Initiative)

Dolan Morgan, Internationals Network.

Maria Monica Andia (The Door)

Eve Stotland (The Door)

Harun Atkas (International High School at LaGuardia Community College)

John Matthew Diaz (International High School for Health Sciences)

Pierre Gedeon (The Brooklyn International High School)

Julie Ma (The Brooklyn International High School)

Steve Ma (The Brooklyn International High School)

POST & WIN!

Post about our FALL PD by using @intlsnetwork, #IntlsNetwork, and #FallPD.

The “best” post will receive a copy of Far Away Brothers by Lauren Markham.

 

WORKSHOP DESCRIPTIONS

Morning Workshops

EXPERIENCING THE INTERNATIONALS APPROACH

This workshop begins with a lesson taught entirely in a foreign language. After an initial experience in which the content is delivered in this language with no supports, participants are taught the same content through activities, curriculum, and instruction that models good teaching for students who are not proficient in the language of instruction. Participants have the opportunity to reflect on the experience of the two different lessons and to look closely at several of the techniques the “teacher” uses that were effective for them. This workshop is a useful introduction to the Internationals Approach as it puts participants in the shoes of their students and helps them gain first-hand experience with the benefits of teaching students using the techniques expanded on in the other workshops.

 

LET’S GIVE ‘EM SOMETHING TO TALK ABOUT: STRATEGIES FOR INTEGRATING LANGUAGE AND CONTENT                   

This workshop supports all teachers in becoming language teachers, regardless of the content they teach. This enables students to develop their academic language in all content areas while deepening their knowledge of content, which is crucial in preparing students for the Common Core State Standards. This series of professional development activities provides faculty with key strategies for incorporating language development into all activities and a framework for planning for both language and content in curriculum development. This workshop includes a model lesson, sample curriculum, an opportunity to work on curriculum using a specific language planning framework, videos of instruction modeling language and content integration, and a resource guide of hands-on, easy to implement strategies.

 

GREAT MINDS THINK DIFFERENTLY: HETEROGENEITY                   

This workshop provides faculty with core strategies to enable students at different academic and English proficiency levels to access academically rigorous curriculum at a variety of entry points. This workshop provides a book of strategies, each of which is supported by multiple curriculum examples. Participants progress through a series of stations that engage participants with these strategies. The workshop concludes with participants having time to create or revise their own curriculum to better address the needs of a heterogeneous class.

 

MORNING HUMANITIES PORTFOLIO NORMING                            

This workshop will provide teachers who have not had the opportunity to norm using the Internationals GWPP rubrics to evaluate student work of varying levels.  Using the INPS anchor papers, teachers will have the opportunity to evaluate student work in their subject area and then compare their grades to the official anchor paper grade. Groups will then come to a consensus on the final grade. Participants will leave this workshop better prepared to evaluate students using the GWPP rubrics.

 

MORNING STEM PORTFOLIO NORMING                

This workshop will provide teachers who have not had the opportunity to norm using the Internationals GWPP rubrics to evaluate student work of varying levels.  Using the INPS anchor papers, teachers will have the opportunity to evaluate student work in their subject area and then compare their grades to the official anchor paper grade. Groups will then come to a consensus on the final grade. Participants will leave this workshop better prepared to evaluate students using the GWPP rubrics.

 

HERO GENESIS: UNDERSTANDING THE SECRET LANGUAGE OF COMICS 

Participants will explore the grammar of comics using Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics and the X-Men storyline. They will also gain strategies and tools to use comics to explore contemporary history, build character development, integrate social emotional learning development, and scaffold both narrative and language structures.

 

TRANSFORMATIONAL RELATIONSHIPS: GROWING WITH OUR STUDENTS

What does it take to truly engage young people who have been failed by society over and over again? What barriers and personal biases get in the way to form meaningful relationships with marginalized youth? In this workshop you will reflect and learn about the concept of creating “transformational relationships” that will move both you and young people to heal and grow. You will walk away with a deeper knowledge and awareness about the experience of marginalized youth, and identify ways to better support them through a restorative approach. This workshop will support teachers in fostering safe spaces and welcoming community at their school by providing a lens of what it means to create transformational relationships with youth and how these strategies can be implement in their school community.

 

A MATHEMATICAL THINKING EXPERIENCE            

How do we help students to develop a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts and procedures? What mathematical thinking do students need to do to develop this deeper understand? Our learners deserve an opportunity to explore and investigate mathematical concepts and relationships using relevant and purposeful math tasks and assignments. In this workshop, we will examine the graduation math PBAT and students’ written reports, project requirements, and possible applications of the project. We will also experience some of the instructional strategies and activities to cater to the learning needs of our exceptional English language learner students.

 

PROTOCOLS FOR PURPOSEFUL AND GUIDED DISCUSSION IN THE CLASSROOM AND MEETINGS         

This workshop is perfect for any team leaders, committee chairs, and/or any educator interested in adapting protocols for the classroom. Protocols guide conversations by focusing on an objective, ensuring participation of all members and maximizing use of time. In this workshop participants will experience various protocols to look at students work, get feedback on an existing project, discuss readings with students, brainstorm solutions for current issues, and adapt them for advisory circles. Participants are encouraged to bring a project that they would want to receive feedback on.

 

SOCRATIC SEMINARS           

The goal of this workshop is to help teachers develop strategies for holding Socratic seminars in their classes. We will present examples of different seminar formats and supports that can encourage participation from all students, regardless of English proficiency. We will also see examples of texts for Social Studies, Science, and English classes that can be used for these seminars.

 

THE ART OF CRITICAL PEDAGOGY IN THE PROJECT-BASED CLASSROOM

Based on one teacher’s work with the book by the same name, The Art of Critical Pedagogy, written by Ernest Morrell and Jeffrey M.R. Duncan-Andrade, this workshop will offer participants a look into a unit of 12th grade social studies curriculum organized around action research, with a view toward exploring the possibilities for putting the principles of critical pedagogy into practice in the context of the urban high school. While many teachers are familiar with the educator-philosopher Paulo Freire and his foundational theory of critical pedagogy, most struggle to translate this theory, which came out of work with adult learners in rural Brazil, into action in their classrooms with adolescent learners in city schools. While this workshop does not purport to resolve this contradiction, participants will come away feeling empowered to plan and implement projects that truly center student voice and student experience, and which support students to engage in genuine inquiry with the potential for real community impact.

 

WRITING IS THINKING: STRATEGIC INQUIRY (WITSI) STRATEGIES FOR ELLS        

Participants will be introduced to various writing and language development interventions for students in the form of Hochman Writing Strategies. These strategies can be utilized across academic disciplines in varying applications and combined throughout the course of rigorous projects, such as essays, lab reports, and PBATs to enhance student writing. We will present examples of various writing strategies ranging from the sentence to paragraph level as well as techniques to combine them within content based classroom activities.

 

TRAUMA INFORMED STRATEGIES TO USE IN THE CLASSROOM               

This workshop will provide an overview of trauma, strategies for recognizing triggers, and symptoms that may present in our students in the classroom. The workshop will also provide strategies and tools to use in the classroom when working with students who have experienced trauma. This workshop will help teachers empathize with students who have experienced trauma so they can create safe educational spaces that support student learning.

 

MATH AND SCIENCE PROJECT TASK ALIGNMENT  

How can science and math curriculums complement one another? In this workshop session, participants will spend time exploring the horizontal alignment between math and science contents. They will then use this alignment to find opportunities for interdisciplinary math and science tasks. Finally, participants will spend time developing mastery-based, interdisciplinary math and science projects.

 

GLOBALISM, SOLIDARITY, AND BLACK LIVES: BRINGING BLACK LIVES MATTER WEEK TO INTERNATIONAL SCHOOLS

What are the principles of the Black Lives Matter movement, and how can they help us, as educators, create affirming and safe classrooms for our students and the intersecting and various identities they bring to our classrooms? During the 2016-2017 school year, educators in Seattle and Philadelphia organized events, lessons, and workshops in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, a movement that affirms the value of Black lives and Black folks’ contributions to society in the face of historical and systemic oppression. This year, educators are already planning a Black Lives Matter week across New York City and the nation in January/February. In this workshop, we will discuss why we should be bringing BLM and its 13 guiding principles into our classrooms, and discuss how we can do this. Facilitators will share resources from Philadelphia as participants discuss how to engage youth critically with the issues impacting our communities and our world.

 

SOCIAL JUSTICE AND MATH             

Mathematics can help illuminate issues of social justice in unique ways, and we can bring this to life in our classrooms. In this workshop session, we will present, discuss and share ideas and resources for embedding social justice in math classes. The ideas, framework, and resources can help math teachers create lessons, projects or units with themes of equality as well as pedagogical techniques that support equity.

 

CLASSCRAFT: GAMIFYING YOUR CLASSROOM

Gamification is a common strategy for increasing engagement in multiple fields. How can it be used in the classroom? Using the Classcraft platform, teachers will see examples of how it was put into action to increase student engagement, team work, and adherence to norms and expectations in and out of class. Classcraft is a platform that introduces the idea of the importance of team work as well as cooperation. Participants will investigate how it has been implemented in an Internationals classroom, brainstorm rules, and explore Classcraft set up.

 

RELEASE THE PRESSURE AND STEAM IT UP!  

A true hands on workshop that will include two piloted STEAM projects led by science teachers! Teachers from all disciplines are encouraged to join and will be able to develop project ideas that include science, technology, engineering, arts and math components. Scaffolded materials for differentiation will be provided and all activities are aligned with Next Generation Science Standards.

 

PROMOTING SELF ADVOCACY FOR SIFE THROUGH COMMUNITY BUILDING       

How can we empower SIFE to advocate for themselves in our communities? In this workshop, we will explore tools for supporting SIFE in developing skills to advocate for themselves in their school communities and beyond. By the end of the workshop, you will have at least one strategy to use with your students that promotes their awareness of self and voice in your community.

 

 

Full Day Workshops

USING TECHNOLOGY TO SUPPORT LITERACY, BUILD COMMUNITY AND EMPOWER ELL STUDENTS

In this full-day workshop, participants will engage in a stations activity with various technological tools including: Apps for beginner ELLs, gamified formative assessments, the Google platform to facilitate assessments and collaboration, and Apple apps to engage students in social awareness. The second half of the workshop will include time for participants to modify or augment lesson plans using technology.

 

READING PROTOCOL FOR DIVERSE READING LEVELS       

This full-day workshop will introduce a reading protocol used in a 9/10 ELA class. The protocol is differentiated to meet the needs of high, mid, and low level readers and can be used across content areas. In this workshop, teachers will experience the reading protocol as students. The facilitator will model how to use an anchor text and leveled texts to support and challenge all levels of readers in a heterogeneous 9/10th grade class.

 

KNOWING HISTORY!             

This full-day workshop will ask participants to consider history and if we can truly know and understand the past. The workshop will allow participants to examine the role of time and perspective when trying to understand history. Participants will use technology to conduct inquiry about history. After lunch participants will visit the Mount Vernon Hotel Museum and use their skills from the morning to analyze the museum and its message. There is a $10 entrance fee for the museum.

 

 

Afternoon Workshops

CAREER READINESS IN THE CLASSROOM               

What does it actually mean to be “career ready”? How can we teach the soft skills needed to fill in the gaps that 21st-century employers are looking for? This workshop will review the New York State Learning Standards for Career Development and Occupational Studies and share some practices and projects already used in the Internationals classrooms. Most importantly, it will give participants a chance to build on these ideas for use in their own classrooms and schools.

 

CORE PRINCIPLES OF THE INTERNATIONALS APPROACH 

This workshop takes participants through a series of interactive stations, each of which is devoted to one of the five core principles of the internationals approach. Through the course of these five stations, participants watch videos, review resources, and look at curriculum to learn how each core principle is embodied in practice. Finally, there is time for open discussion of questions and implications for the classroom.

 

THE ART OF CONSTRUCTIVE CONVERSATIONS                  

Learn how to design and teach students to engage in constructive classroom conversations of all kinds in this abridged version of the Internationals Network’s interactive workshop. Participants will explore the various core conversation skills students need and immerse themselves in activities that foster the development of those skills within students. We will also look closely at Talk Moves, the key phrases that teachers and students alike can use to keep a conversation focused and on-track. In addition, participants will receive a resource book filled with instructions for implementing a wide array of diverse conversational formats in their classrooms.

 

MEANINGFUL STUDENT CHOICE IN PROJECTS                   

Providing students with more choice and voice in project-based learning creates greater student buy-in, increases motivation, and enhances students’ decision-making skills.  Discover strategies for affording your students greater choice in the way in which they demonstrate their learning to you through projects, thereby creating a more culturally responsive classroom.  You will have the chance to apply your new knowledge by adapting a former project of your own so that students are offered more choice and voice.

 

AFTERNOON HUMANITIES PORTFOLIO NORMING            

This workshop will provide teachers who have not had the opportunity to norm using the Internationals GWPP rubrics to evaluate student work of varying levels.  Using the INPS anchor papers, teachers will have the opportunity to evaluate student work in their subject area and then compare their grades to the official anchor paper grade. Groups will then come to a consensus on the final grade. Participants will leave this workshop better prepared to evaluate students using the GWPP rubrics.

 

AFTERNOON STEM PORTFOLIO NORMING            

Sevi Vogiazi

This workshop will provide teachers who have not had the opportunity to norm using the Internationals GWPP rubrics to evaluate student work of varying levels.  Using the INPS anchor papers, teachers will have the opportunity to evaluate student work in their subject area and then compare their grades to the official anchor paper grade. Groups will then come to a consensus on the final grade. Participants will leave this workshop better prepared to evaluate students using the GWPP rubrics.

 

INFO SESSION: FUND FOR TEACHERS AND MATH FOR AMERICA 

Do you want to get your STEM research project funded? Do you want to be part of a fellowship that makes teaching a viable, rewarding, and respected career choice for the best minds in science and mathematics? Join us as we walk you through the process of applying for Fund for Teachers and Math for America. You will gain an understanding on how to write a Fund for Teacher research proposal and what it entails to be successful in your Math for America application. Your participation in this workshop will be the first step in having your dream research project realized and in becoming a part of the Math for America community.

 

STOP THE MUTANT REGISTRATION ACT: USING COMICS TO TELL SECRET ORIGIN STORIES

Participants will be introduced to the unit using the X-Men graphic novel God Loves, Man Kills (1982) to understand, explore and create secret origin stories. The workshop will use the fictional world of mutant persecution as a thematic background to create hero narratives using character development and world building.

 

RESPONSIVE TEACHING: A FOCUS ON FAMILY SEPARATION AND REUNIFICATION       

Being more aware of the social contexts that young people find themselves within can greatly enhance our ability to effectively support their ongoing academic success. Many of our students have experienced family separation due to immigration; this has an impact on our students at school and at home. It is important, as teachers of our students, that we are aware of this phenomenon, and to know that there are concrete examples of activities and strategies that can address this topic with students and colleagues. In this workshop, participants will learn about the topic of family separation and how it impacts students in Internationals schools. Participants will also be exposed to numerous activities that can be used in the classroom and will have the opportunity to plan for ways to bring these ideas and strategies back to their own schools.

 

FAMILY ENGAGEMENT         

Parent engagement is an important piece of building school community and creating trust between staff, administrators, students and families. By coming together, this workshop will provide an opportunity to see what are the ways that families are being engaged in your school community, build on that framework and create action plans around family engagement in your respective schools.

 

“I OWE HOW MUCH?”: DEVELOPING FINANCIAL LITERACY BEFORE IT’S TOO LATE

Poll your classes (or even staff!), and you may find that some are already in debt, or know someone who is. Learning to speak the language of finance will prepare our young people to protect themselves against predatory product offers, empower them in their decisions as they navigate credit, financial aid, and student loans, and begin to plan for the future. In this workshop, we will discuss how to support financial literacy in a math classroom, with opportunities to explore interdisciplinary connections and adaptations of curriculum across grade levels.

 

MEDIATING CULTURAL ENCOUNTERS: GEEKERY, POP CULTURE, AND AFFINITY SPACES

Learn to take your students’ overwhelming passion for their favorite shows/games/comics/movies/whatever into positive language learning while also building comfortable places for kids to be themselves. Using activities from the New Media Club (aka the Nerd Club) at IHS at Prospect Heights, we’ll be exploring the ways that media and pop culture can bring students together across languages and cultures while building their confidence to engage in school in a deeper way. Participants are encouraged to bring their own media-based practices or stories of affinity spaces. This is for the nerds, the geeks, and other kids who sometimes feel isolated because no one seems to want to discuss the latest episode of “Rick and Morty.” Our students bring so many identities to school with them every day, and this workshop encourages teachers to look beyond our commonly-considered categories and explore new ways to connect students with positive support networks.

 

HANDS ON ENGAGEMENT: BOOKMAKING AND WEAVING          

Are you looking for tactile experiences that can be incorporated into your class curriculum or advisory? Hands-on bookmaking and weaving may be what your looking for. Participants in this session will have the opportunity to engage in art activities that may be creatively realized into your project-based classroom. The goal is that each teacher leaves the workshop with tactile examples to take back to their classroom. This art workshop will provide project ideas that help engage students to honor their emotions and introspective well being. Artwork also is a way for students to share common values.

 

REDEFINING STUDENT GOVERNMENT  

How can we as educators support students in choosing a system of student government that allows students to actively engage in their school community? Student leaders from MIHS will speak about their experiences with redefining what student government looks like at their school. We would love to have a chance to brainstorm ideas and learn from one another regarding promising practices in student government. When we respect student voices and give them agency in school, feelings of belonging to the community are enhanced.

 

EDUCATION NOT DEPORTATION: SUPPORTING UNDOCUMENTED YOUTH LEADERSHIP IN SCHOOLS

In a political climate in which undocumented folks are being increasingly criminalized, it is important now more than ever to discuss ways in which educators can stand in solidarity with our undocumented students and families. In this workshop, teachers from the TeachDream educator network and organizers from the NYS Youth Leadership Council (the first undocumented student led organization in NY) will share best practices for collaboration and explore ways to use Dream Teams to empower immigrant students in schools.

 

DEVELOPING A SLIFE (MATH) COURSE

We will share our experience developing a SLIFE Math curriculum at TC Williams International Academy and provide a framework for other schools to develop their own based on their needs and curricular goals. Our Students with Limited or Interrupted Formal Education (SLIFE) come to us with a need not just to learn high-school level curriculum, but the need to learn how to be in school and what it means to be a student.  Providing them with an appropriate, accessible curriculum creates a safe place for them to learn, make meaning, and feel ownership of their education.  This workshop will support teachers with a framework for developing their own SLIFE math course to meet the needs of their students who may otherwise be marginalized.

 

SCIENCE PBATS AND THE NEXT GENERATION SCIENCE STANDARDS (NGSS)     

This workshop is designed as a working group for teachers who want to incorporate the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) into their work with Science Performance Based Assessment Tasks (PBATs). Together this group will explore and create strategies and scaffolds for integrating the NGSS core ideas, crosscutting concepts, and science engineering practices into current or future Science PBATs.

 

“SUPER SENIORS”: PROMISES AND POSSIBILITIES            

This workshop is intended to be a space to explore both the philosophical and programmatic approaches to serving students in their 5th and 6th years. Participants are encouraged to bring questions, artifacts and data about these students in our schools. We will learn about various programming and curriculum options that a school could implement to meet their needs.

 

SOCIAL JUSTICE CIRCLES FOR ELLS              

How can we create a more peaceful and just learning community where all learners and teachers feel valued? Continuing the training from Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility, we have implemented restorative circles as part of our classroom practice and social justice curriculum. The circle process is a way to build community, practice problem-solving and conflict resolution, and discuss controversial topics in a safe space. Circles can be used in advisory classes or in content classes. This Practice-Oriented Presentation will ask attendees to participate in a circle as active listeners and contribute to discussions, all of which can be difficult for ELLs. We have developed scaffolding and differentiation techniques to aid this process which we will discuss and share. We will also share ways to infuse our curricula with social justice themes.

 

HOW CAN PROJECTS BE STRENGTHENED TO FOSTER STUDENT ENGAGEMENT?           

Project-based learning (PBL) is a key element of a core Internationals principal. This workshop is designed for participants to bring a project with which to reflect and revise through the lens of the eight essential design elements of PBL. The eight essential elements of PBL that we will explore are the Challenging Problem/ Question, Key Knowledge & Skills, Sustained Inquiry, Authenticity, Student Voice & Choice, Critique & Revision, Reflection, and Public Product. Participants will leave the workshop with an understanding of these eight essential elements, identify where their own project idea does and does not align, and receive feedback around ideas to strengthen the project. This work will be done through whole group presentations, a hands-on activity, self-reflection, and a Critical Friends feedback protocol.

 

 

 

 

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